A Little Bit of Jamnagar

When I was planning my Gujarat itinerary last year, the most important consideration was my parents as this trip was for them. I had to plan an itinerary with enough and more breaks so that it would be comfortable for them. This was crucial as my father has acute motion sickness, something that developed as he aged and it’s so bad that he cannot travel at a stretch even when moving from one place to another within the city. That’s why Jamnagar ended up being part of the itinerary as a break between Ahmedabad and Dwarika. The travel of 7-8 hours by car from Ahmedabad to Dwarika wouldn’t work for my father. So, we took a train to Jamnagar, stayed back one night, and then proceeded to Dwarika.

Jamnagar, the city of Jaamsahebs, was known as Nawanagar when it was established centuries ago at the banks of Rangmati and Nagmati rivers.

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Pic 1: Ranmal Lake, at the center of which is Lakhota Fort

The feeling of FOMO (Fear of Missing Out) would have made me sick if I was to leave the city without experiencing anything of it. So, before leaving for Dwarika, we decided to go to Jamnagar’s signature tourist spot – Lakhota Fort located in the middle of Ranmal Lake. The fort was not quite like the fort we expected but was not bad either.

Ranmal Lake, also known as Lakhota Talav was constructed by the Maharaja of Jamnagar, Jam Ranmalji-II, between 1820 to 1852 and spreads around 5 lakh sq. meters. A sprawling garden surrounds the lake with pavilions for resting and pathways for walking around. The pathways were very spacious and I would not be exaggerating if I say they were larger than many a road in my city of Bangalore.

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Pic 2: Walkways inside the garden

It was morning time and we found elderly people walking around or seated at different places gobbling up the morning newspaper while youngsters were jogging through the morning air. On the back ground was playing old Kishore Kumar melodies throughout the garden making the morning refreshingly soothing and beautiful.

My parents and I walked around leisurely and the garden was turning out to be a good place to start the day. The lake and the garden was very well maintained. There were several entrance gates and a nominal entry fee was charged.

We learnt that the well-maintained lake was used for pearl culture during the times of the Maharaja.

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Pic 3: Lakhota Fort or Lakhota Palace
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Pic 4: Lakhota Fort or Lakhota Palace as you enter from the connecting bridge.

At the center of the lake is the Lakhota Fort or Lakhota Palace, the latter being a better description of the place. A short causeway that runs over the lake like a bridge connects the garden to the palace. The palace houses a museum that stores artifacts and pottery dating from 9th to 18th century. Photography is not allowed inside.

The palace was built in the mid-19th-century by Maharaja Jam Ranmalji-II, at the same time when he built the lake. I am not much of an architecture person but the fine woodcarvings at the palace did catch my attention.

At the south east side of the lake, is Bala Hanuman temple. The specialty of this temple is that it is in Guinness Book of Records for non-stop chants of “Shri Ram, Jai Ram, Jai Jai Ram” that have been going on continuously since 1st August, 1964.

With my FOMO put to rest, we happily exited Jamnagar and proceeded to Dwarika.

[Click Here to read my Dwarika experience.]

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Pic 5: The Bala Hanuman Temple

 

Author: neelstoria

Traveling, Gardening, Trekking, Hiking, Storytelling, Writing, Nature, Outdoors, Yoga, DIY

10 thoughts on “A Little Bit of Jamnagar”

  1. If your father’s motion sickness is simple vertigo, you might do some research on line. When suffering badly from it for six months, I found some exercises solved it in about two weeks. Boiled down to the essence, the exercises just involved moving quickly to induce the vertigo and then hanging on for dear life until it passed. Its cause was an inner ear disturbance, and I’m guessing the brain learned to adjust.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh I see. This is great information, Ralie. Thank you so much.
      Surely there’s got be exercises for this, maybe some yoga asanas too. I never thought of it. I will share this with everyone I know who suffers from motion sickness. Thank you, once again.

      Like

    1. Ah! I see. My father does try to close his eyes. He also pops in an Avomine tablet, which probably induces some sleep. Some people recommend chewing gum and also smelling newspaper. Don’t know how much these things help.

      Like

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