Mt. Annapurna – Up Close and Personal

Contd. from Annapurna – The Journey Begins

There had been no more rains since last evening and clear blue skies greeted us in the morning. The Sun was shining up in the mountain tops but was yet to reach the valley, where Bamboo, our tea house, was located. As a result, it was cold at Bamboo.

Through the Bamboo Forest

After breakfast, we started off for the day. The walk through the forest continued. This time, it was a dense and damp forest dominated by Bamboo trees. The Bamboo Forest was even more beautiful and enigmatic than the forest we had walked the day before. Not surprising, I found myself completely lost in a world of my own.

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Pic 1: The enchanting Bamboo Forest

The trees and shrubs, the bushes and creepers, the roots and leaves all seemed to be interacting with me as though telling me unknown tales of their mysterious wonderland. Each and every leaf exuded radiance, shimmering in the morning freshness. The renewed sparkle can be well attributed to the rains that had happened the day before. “Don’t they seem to have just stepped out of a beauty parlour, massaged and manicured with some essential oils,” I remarked. My sister gave me a scornful look, rolled her eyes, and walked on.

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Pic 2: Somewhere in the Bamboo forest
Dovan to Himalaya

Enjoying every bit of the walk we leisurely reached Dovan, the next tea house where clear views of Macharepuchare peak greeted us. We took 2.5 hours instead of the expected 1.5 hour to get here. Thanks to our frequent stops in the forest to admire the flowers, caress tree trunks, marvel at the leaves of various shapes and sized, inspect the moss-covered boulders, etc. What’s the hurry! Somewhere we even crossed a stream through a rickety broken bridge.

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Pic 3: Precariously crossing the rickety bridge over a stream.

The forest continued beyond Dovan and soon we hit upon a relatively wide footpath that can be well described as the rustic version of a cobblestone pathway. At the start of the pathway a notice was displayed with clear information about maintaining the sanctity of the place as a highly revered temple lay ahead in the forest. Soon, we landed at the temple. It was a Shiva and Parvati temple. A tall jagged mountain stood behind the temple adorned by a cascading waterfall that spread across the breadth of the mountain.

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Pic 4: The rustic version of a cobblestone pathway
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Pic 5: The notice displayed on a tree about a kilometer before the temple.

Beyond the temple was a steep set of stairs that continued all the way almost upto Himalaya, the next tea house. The stairs were well defined at the beginning only to be replaced by rustic boulders later. At Himalaya, we took a tea break. Dark clouds filled in the sky and it started drizzling. We slipped into our rain jackets and continued walking.

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Pic 6: The Shiva-Parvati temple with a waterfall cascading on the mountain behind it.
Gray Langurs at Hinku Cave

The climb continued after Himalaya but the forest started slowly thinning out. Multiple waterfalls strewn here and there from the mountain tops drained vertically down into Modi Khola that thundered somewhere in the deep gorges. In some places the trail was very narrow and we had to be cautious with our footing. In all such ascends, I would mostly be alone as my sister walked slowly way behind with Amar, our guide.

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Pic 7: The bunch of Gray Langurs at Hinku Cave

After sometime, a short but very steep climb got us face-to-face with a huge overhanging rock. This was Hinku Cave. All over this huge rock, were a large number of Gray Langurs – young and old, babies and families. We paused for a while to watch the over-energetic playful bunch hopping around before continuing our walk towards Deurali.

Surrounded by Waterfalls at Deurali

Soon we spotted the tiny blue tinned roofs of the tea houses in the far distance. Finally, Deorali was in sight though it was still quite a walk away. Simultaneously, Modi Khola made its grand appearance gushing away in leaps and bounds through the gorge. After a while we crossed a bridge and yet another set of steep stairs stared at us that would take us up to Deurali – our stop for the day at 3230 m.

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Pic 8: When we first saw the Himalayan Sunflower just before Deurali
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Pic 9: Crossing over Modi Khola just before arriving at Deurali.

We reached Deurali in the afternoon. The sun was shining bright when we arrived, but it lasted just for 10-15 min. No complaints, as it was enough to dry our partially wet clothes. There were several waterfalls all around us – in the valley in front and the tall mountain behind. We couldn’t enjoy the view for long as thick fog descended and progressively it got very cold. However, the evening sky was kind enough to put on a show of some gorgeous display of colours breaking the monotony of the drab foggy afternoon. A peak in the surrounding mountain resembled Lord Buddha’s face and we got to see that only the following morning, all thanks to the fog.

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Pic 10: Numerous waterfalls trickle from the mountains all around Deurali tea house. 
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Pic 11: The evening sky puts up a show of colours breaking the monotony of the drab foggy afternoon.
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Pic 12: The Information Board at Deurali looked good and was worthy of a picture.
Her Very Own Flower Garden

As we left Deurali, we stepped into a valley guarded by tall mountains on both sides. The morning was cold, and the sun was yet to reach the valley. We passed through few easy ascents and descents through the rugged trail with Macharepuchare staring at us from the right. The familiar fish-tail shape was missing and I could not recognize the peak until Amar pointed it out.

After a while a picturesque sight greeted us. The snow-clad Gangapurna made an appearance at the horizon glowing with the first rays of the sun even as the valley still remained in shadow.

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Pic 13: Gangapurna glows with the first rays of the sun while the valley is still in shadows.

Gradually, the valley opened up and we walked through a flat stretch of winding trail as Modi Khola gushed away right beside us. After the forest, I fell in love with this section of the trail. The entire area was carpeted with multitudes of unique flowering plants. The bushes on either side were sprinkled with yellows and purples and whites and reds. Every few steps we were compelled to halt, not just for admiring the colours but the shapes and structures of the flowers. This place felt like Mt. Annapurna’s personal patio, a place she personally nurtured. No other explanation seemed plausible enough to justify such divine beauty.   

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Face-to-Face with Macharepuchare

A relatively steep trail started soon after the flower garden. After about an hour or so, we reached the Macharepuchare Base Camp (MBC), at an elevation of 3,700 m. It was a bright and sunny day. The sky was azure blue but some frivolous floating clouds appeared from nowhere and decided to spoil the show. On one side was the pointed-tipped Macharepuchare and on the other side Annapurna South. The clouds flirted with the both the mountains leaving us high and dry with only occasional glimpses. After a cup of tea, we headed towards our final destination – ABC.

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Pic 15: A quick glimpse of Macharepuchare before the clouds came in.
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Pic 16: A glimpse of Annapurna South from MBC
Towards Annapurna Base Camp

As we started climbing up towards ABC, the floating clouds got thicker. The blue sky disappeared and everything around us was completely white-washed. A strong wind started blowing and it was getting really cold. Slowly and steadily we climbed up the winding pathway greeted by meadows, flowers, glacial streams. We could see only our immediate surroundings, the thick white blanket allowed no more.

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Pic 17: A herd of sheep laze around just as we started climbing towards ABC while the clouds start slowly moving in.
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Pic 18: Towards ABC while the surroundings are slowly and progressively whitewashed.
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Pic 19: Just before ABC, Annapurna-I and the tea houses are seen in the background. This was clicked when we were leaving, the weather was clear that day.

It was no different even an hour and half later when we arrived at Annapurna Base Camp. We could see nothing at all, which was disappointing to say the least. And, we all know how adamant clouds can be in the mountains when they arrive in the later half of the day. We made peace, oblivious of the miracle that would unfold a little while later.

Continue Reading In the Lap of Mother Divine.

Author: neelstoria

Traveling, Gardening, Trekking, Hiking, Storytelling, Writing, Nature, Outdoors, Yoga, DIY

19 thoughts on “Mt. Annapurna – Up Close and Personal”

  1. I enjoyed thoroughly going through your blog, it is just like walking with you on those trail virtually. The way you minutely remember each and every step literally on trails is just amazing. Looking forward to the next episode.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Narendra.
      I feel I haven’t done justice enough in describing this trek. Though, you never can feel fully satisfied with writing about such experiences but it could have been better. Been out of sync with writing for a while now. Don’t know why this is happening….

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I feel, Neelanjana, you are being hard on yourself. From whatever limited experience I have on writing, I have a conjecture of what probably happens: when we try to write up a narrative, we revisit that place and moment from memory so that we can recount it as true to the actual experience. But the emotions are never the same – we almost always have different things going on in our mind as well as in our busy routine when we are digging up these memories. Secondly, never can the written word sufficiently narrate the actual feelings that you have experienced. Suffice to say that, with both these scenarios playing out, the writer will always feel that he/she has not done enough justice to the narrative. But the reader is loving it!

        Tell you what – take a short break from the routine, sit in a tranquil place where there’s only you and our Mother, and rewrite it. Let us see how it pans out! 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

        1. Totally agree with whatever you say here (except the last part of writing again :D)…
          If I compare this one with the other trek stories I’ve written, it feels I could have done better.
          As you correctly mention, sometimes life come on the way….¯\_(ツ)_/¯

          Liked by 1 person

  2. A wonderful narrative. Loved every bit of it. You can easily get all these travelogues published one day – self-publishing as an e-book is not tough now, courtesy Amazon. They’ll do everything for you. And these would sell as a paper book as well, I’m sure. But you need to build up on the collection. All the best.

    Liked by 1 person

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